'The Times' full frontal assault on Home Ed

Rise in home-schooling raises fear of children drifting off safety radar

http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/education/article4706283.ece

Home-schooling has soared in the past five years, prompting fears that vulnerable children are falling off the authorities’ radar or being radicalised.
The boom is primarily being fuelled by parents missing out on places at the best schools or shunning their culture of excessive testing. Figures from an investigation by The Times show a 45 per cent increase in home education in the last five years, with almost 33,000 children now home-schooled.

. . . Neil Carmichael, the Conservative chairman of the education select committee, said that it was unacceptable and he wanted parents to have to register their children with councils. He has written privately to Nicky Morgan, the education secretary, expressing concern.

The committee will question her on it when she next appears before it. Michael Wilshaw, the head ofOfsted, has also written to Mrs Morgan after his inspectors uncovered squalid conditions at an unregistered Muslim private school in Birmingham. He warned that some institutions were exploiting the freedoms afforded to home educators as a cover for unsafe conditions and radical teaching.
and a leading article:

Home School Boom
http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/opinion/leaders/article4706178.ece

Parents who educate their children at home should be monitored


. . . Not all parents are as trustworthy or levelheaded. With freedom comes the opportunity to inculcate a particular religiousor cultural ideology, or to foster extremism. At present local authorities are allowed to conduct an informal inquiry if concerns are raised. The government should press ahead with granting greater powers to monitor a child's education and development and, where necessary, to intervene. - Previous attempts to regulate home education have fallen'foul of human rights law or been met with opposition from parents who believe registration is the thin end of a wedge that ends in monitoring and officialinspections. Both,alas, are sometimes necessary. A parent's right to choose must be subordinate to a child's wellbeing. Once this is guaranteed, let freedom reign.


This look pretty serious and I am very concerned that the question to the Education Secretary along with her answer will have been stitched up. We'll see but this is something we all need to get involved with.
 
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