Open University options

donns2

ScotHE
Hi, my daughter went back to school thinking that the best/easiest chance of getting to uni would be to get recognised qualifications, however she's been there a year and hates it and has still has another year before she gets her National 5's then onto Highers so I've been looking at alternatives apart from the iGCSE route. (she was put back a year a school as starting half way through 3rd year and they were transitioning with the CfE).

I was thinking of going down the OU route and was wondering has anyone done this and did they get into Uni. She's turning 16 in the summer and loves the Arts/Languages (wants to do Russian and something else atm). I'm waiting for Glasgow Uni to get back. OU was suggesting an Access Course but have a funny feeling Glasg Uni won't accept the one they're suggesting as has no credits attached to it.

Just curious has anyone else gone from OU to Uni, or any other suggestions apart from GCSEs.
Thanks
Donna
 

Diane

HEdups
Hi Donna,

My daughter did an Open University legal studies course worth one half of an undergraduate year.

She was accepted into university, and is enjoying it so much.

So, yes, it can be done.
 

donns2

ScotHE
thanks for that Diane. Just wondering did she have any qualifications as such before starting the OU course, and how old was she when she did the OU course. Thanks Donna
 

Diane

HEdups
Hi Donna,

She was interested in taking a few GCSEs (Maths and Science), then finished last year with one in English.

Just trying to recall when she took the course. I think she was 17. She actually took a very basic (too simple for her really) Environmental Course the year before. The Open University representative telephoned to see if my daughter could cope with the study involved in taking the Environmental course. Of course, being home educated, my girl was used to self-study and she had no trouble convincing the OU representative that she would do well.

And she did.

Actually, when universities are sensible and some are these days, they realise that home educated youngsters are ahead of the game. They don't have to be spoon-fed information; they can work on their own; they're motivated to stick with what they are interested in. So much of what home educators do is what universities prize in their students.

Often, it's a match made in heaven.

But, of course, university isn't for everyone, and there are loads of opportunities elsewhere too.

I hope that helps, Donna.
 
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