On Police Scotland, data failures, and being labelled a “victim”

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Here is another example of grand theft data by Police Scotland. We know of several other cases where personal sensitive data has been passed on without the knowledge, never mind consent, of the data subjects.

On Police Scotland, data failures, and being labelled a “victim”

Out of nowhere, I received a call from a charity called Victim Support Scotland. They wanted to know if I was in a safe place to talk; bizarrely, I was sat right here at my desk. They then said that they had been advised by Police Scotland that I had been the victim of a crime. They wanted to know if I was okay. They wanted to know if I needed counselling or help navigating the legal system. They wanted to know if I needed “emotional or practical support”.

I thought it was a wind-up. I didn’t even know what “crime” she was talking about. But it wasn’t – she was deadly serious. As far as this do-gooder was concerned, I was some wounded, cowering animal crying out for help.

It turned out this was because I had reported a broken close window to Police Scotland to get a report number.
I’ll be left wondering who is not being helped, what data is not being input, what data is not being passed on to the right people, and what data is not being acted on, in the meantime. That’s all aside from the obvious question about what sort of figure-fudging is going on when everyone who contacts a non-emergency number is classfied as a “victim of crime” and then, rather conveniently, “offered support and assistance”, whether they need it or not.
 
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