Need suggestions for my PDD-NOS daughter

Hello!

My 81/2 year old daughter is high functioning on the autistic spectrum. She is bright and inquisitive, but I am challenged by how I go about home educating her. She has more ability than she thinks she has and would prefer to watch My Little Pony movies all day.
This is really our first year of home education. At 6, she went to kindergarten in America where we had to remove her after seven months time because it was not a healthy fit for her. We did nothing but wind her down for the following year, then we began to plan and prepare for our move to the UK. So here we are.
Maths concepts are difficult for her, but we do small bits here and there throughout the week. We are teaching her to tell the time, write, recognize patterns, reading (which she's getting, she just needs confidence!) My daughter has a wonderful imagination, loves to invent stories but isn't willing to let me write them down, and she enjoys singing. We get outside as much as possible to gather snails and such.
In short, I really don't know what my expectations of her should be. She can talk and talk, but at the same time has difficulty in expressing herself. Information goes in, but may not resurface for months. Learning seems to percolate beneath the surface and six months later she'll ask a question about a particular topic or recall information she's learned. I don't know have to gauge what she's learning day to day.
Any help or suggestions will be greatly appreciated!

Kindly,
Carolyn
 

Elaine Kirk

Super Moderator
.
Gauge
..
Is daughter happy and learning?
Am I encouraging and facilitating her learning?
.
From your post I would say you have ticked both boxes .
 
Sounds like you're doing great! You know what definitely doesn't work for her (whatever made you withdraw her from kindergarten) and it sounds like you know what works for her too, letting things perculate and picking it up again when it becomes relevant for her. My kids are younger but that is what I am hoping for really, us putting things/experiences out there and letting them find ways they can make it relevant and interesting to them (or not!).

Lynz x
 
Thank you both for taking the time to reply to my post. I really appreciate your encouragement! I think I need as much confidence as my daughter does as we forge this road of education as a family. I know no one who HE a child, either here or in the States, who has a child with a quirky learning and social skills ; most children I hear about are HE neurotypical children who are either gifted learners or really regular kids in large families. We are small and different, but I know we are not alone.
I also recognize how fortunate we are that our daughter can effectively communicate for the most part. I know there are a lot of families who really never hear their child's 'voice'.
If anyone is in the Suffolk/Cambridgeshire area, I would like to be in contact.

Warm regards,
Carolyn
 
Carolyn, our DS has a quirky personality and a quirky learning style too, we're pretty sure he has dyscalculia like his sister. Only this year is maths starting to make sense for him. For the last 4 or 5 years he wouldn't even allow us to try and help with it, the school's teaching had put him off that much! We had to wait until he brought the subject up. So we had to learn to 'strew' things about and hope he'd try them. Some he did, some not, nothing was taken up with consistency.

So we had to be patient, not panic and... wait until he was ready.

He hates being 'taught' anything and much prefers to learn things for himself.

I've had plenty of panic attacks, but recently, his sister persuaded (challenged) him to do a past paper in foundation maths as he's now GCSE year. He did really well and did the paper really quickly. The only things he had trouble with were because he didn't understand the way the question was written, I didn't understand them either, they were confusingly written.

What has really helped is that he's followed his interests, and his main thing is programming - and you can't programme without maths! So he's learned a lot without realising :clap2:

I'm sure if you follow your child's interests, then learning will happen. You may not be aware of it all the time, but you are clearly sensitive to her needs and will know the best ways to help her, or you'll find out. There's loads of help and free resources out there to help you find the best fit for your child :)

Have you found the local groups in your area? It makes such a difference finding a group that you and your little one feel happy with, and will be a massive support for you when you have the inevitable panic attacks :D
 
Hello!

My 81/2 year old daughter is high functioning on the autistic spectrum. She is bright and inquisitive, but I am challenged by how I go about home educating her. She has more ability than she thinks she has and would prefer to watch My Little Pony movies all day.
This is really our first year of home education. At 6, she went to kindergarten in America where we had to remove her after seven months time because it was not a healthy fit for her. We did nothing but wind her down for the following year, then we began to plan and prepare for our move to the UK. So here we are.
Maths concepts are difficult for her, but we do small bits here and there throughout the week. We are teaching her to tell the time, write, recognize patterns, reading (which she's getting, she just needs confidence!) My daughter has a wonderful imagination, loves to invent stories but isn't willing to let me write them down, and she enjoys singing. We get outside as much as possible to gather snails and such.
In short, I really don't know what my expectations of her should be. She can talk and talk, but at the same time has difficulty in expressing herself. Information goes in, but may not resurface for months. Learning seems to percolate beneath the surface and six months later she'll ask a question about a particular topic or recall information she's learned. I don't know have to gauge what she's learning day to day.
Any help or suggestions will be greatly appreciated!

Kindly,
Carolyn
Carolyn, you've just described my son (and so many others on the autistic spectrum!). I don't worry any more about what he's learning day to day as, like your daughter, we do things that seem to have no impact on him at all and then suddenly a year later he 'gets' it and it's all there, even though he's shown no sign previously that anything stuck.

I've concentrated on healthy, happy, life skills, self care and then the academic stuff has sort of taken care of itself.

If she doesn't like you writing down her stories perhaps you can take photographs to illustrate them or do drawings, models or collages, that sort of thing? Maybe you can use the love of My Little Pony to encourage the writing, if perhaps she would be happy to write sentence or two about what she just watched or what she thinks about what just happened in the film?

My son spends an hour or so a day on You Tube watching films about Lego. To all intents and purposes it looks like a complete waste of time, but he then goes off and builds all sorts of things and creates stories based on the things he's just seen. He's learnt a lot that way, he's a very visual learner as your daughter may be as well?

It sounds as if your daughter is having a great time and doing really well and I don't think you need to worry. Keep in mind that one to one is far more effective than group tuition anyway but also keep in mind that autism can be very tiring because the brain and central nervous system have to work so much harder. I find my son wants to watch a lot of films when he's tired and he just needs something comforting and familiar that he doesn't have to think about or respond to. So perhaps try not to view the film watching as something that isn't educational enough, if that helps, it's all part of them learning how to deal with life (and we all need help on that score!).

Have you contacted HE Special? I was just thinking that there might be people on that list in your area. :)
 
Top