(Home) school's out forever?

"If Graham Badman's recommendations for home tuition are adopted by the government, a whole way of life is under threat"

"Badman, who also chaired the Baby P case review, is due to publish his home education review next week, and unfortunately for home educators, their fears appear to have been justified. The review could recommend compulsory registration of home educators and set minimum standards of education."

http://tinyurl.com/p957om

This reads as if someone has seen what the recommendations are:frusty:
 

Diane

HEdups
I was just trying to post this:

http://daretoknowblog.blogspot.com/

(Home) school's out forever?If Graham Badman's recommendations for home tuition are adopted by the government, a whole way of life is under threat
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Home-educated children can benefit from exposure to museums and day-trips they wouldn't otherwise experience



Home educators have been feeling nervous ever since Graham Badman began his review of home education earlier this year.

The government's announcement of the review came wrapped in sinister language about the need to investigate "claims that home education could be used as a 'cover' for child abuse such as neglect, forced marriage, sexual exploitation or domestic servitude".

For most people, the decision by parents to educate their children outside the school system is difficult to fathom. School is so ingrained in our perception of what is normal that even though many of us will freely admit we hated school, few of us can conceive of not packing our children off with their lunchboxes and pencil cases as soon as they are old enough – which is now just four years old.

Home-educating parents already have to deal with the surprise, concern and hostility their decision evokes, particularly among friends and family. The negative connotations and Daily Mail headlines generated by the government's decision to link home education and child abuse – despite admitting the complete lack of any evidence for such a link – was only going to make things worse.

Ironically, the very reason some parents take their children out of school is because they suffer abuse, through bullying, within the school system.

Many home educators feared that the review's child abuse angle was a cover for something potentially more worrying – after all, most home educators knew they could be quickly and easily cleared of any suspicion of child abuse.

Another stated aim of the review was to investigate "whether local authorities and other public agencies are able to effectively discharge their duties and responsibilities for safeguarding and ensuring a suitable education for all children".

This may seem like a fair and reasonable aim, but to home educators it indicated the government's seeming desire to wrest control over how they educated their children and to decide what constituted "a suitable education". It was this that was making the home-education community most nervous.

Many parents who home educate do so because they don't believe in the school system. They believe that children should be exposed to a fuller and freer experience beyond the confines of desks, timetables and classrooms, and that, given this freedom, they will learn more enthusiastically, more thoroughly and often much more quickly. It is known as autonomous learning.

It may sound like a wacky approach, but a comprehensive study by academics at the University of London recently concluded that such informal learning at home was an "astonishingly efficient way to learn".

The fear was that this approach wouldn't be understood by a meddling state with its fixed definitions of what a "suitable education" might mean, and that home educators would be hassled and cajoled into toeing the line of tests, curriculums and outcomes. For many, their children's wellbeing was seriously under threat.

Badman, who also chaired the Baby P case review, is due to publish his home education review next week, and unfortunately for home educators, their fears appear to have been justified. The review could recommend compulsory registration of home educators and set minimum standards of education.

If this is the case, to a large extent it will remove from parents the responsibility for how their children are educated. For many, without the freedom to learn autonomously, the very reason for home education will cease to exist.

We'll have to wait and see how far any new legislation will go, and how hard home educators will resist it, but let's hope we don't end up with a situation like that in Germany, where the ban on home education means for many parents the only option is to emigrate.

Posted by
Adharanand Finn Friday 5 June 2009 15.42 BST

http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/mortarboard/2009/jun/05/home-education-badman
 

Diane

HEdups
I love the way journalists get to see the report. They've got nothing to do with it. We're the ones whose lives are damaged by this school-crazed idiot's so-called recommendations. Well, we have to move closer to Germany, don't we, folks?

It's like we said from the beginning. This is a challenge to anyone whose children can think for themselves. The government are terrified to allow people just to be...

Diane
http://www.threedegreesoffreedom.blogspot.com
 

Elaine Kirk

Super Moderator
They appear to want to use public disgust re Khyra Ishaq to sneak in leg with this timing. The BBC are not helping with their sloppy reporting (or deliberate misreporting)
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/west_midlands/8084972.stm
Khyra Ishaq died on the 17th May 2008
Mr Abuhamza has admitted five counts of child cruelty relating to other children while Ms Gordon denies five counts of child cruelty between December 2007 and May 17 2008.

the BBC report from todays court proceedings states
Khyra was removed from school and Miss Gordon refused to admit visitors to the house, including a visit by school staff in December 2007 and a check by police a short time later.

This is misinformation !!

What they fail to make clear is that the children were not deregistered until March 2008 as shown from this report
''An educational social worker had visited the family's terraced home in Birmingham within two weeks of Khyra's mother, Angela Gordon, removing her daughter and five other children from a local school, claiming they were being bullied.

But the visit was some eight weeks ago, and last night the family's MP, Khalid Mahmood, said the fact the social worker could not gain access to the house should have triggered further checks.''
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1020941/Independent-inquiry-launched-girl-starved-death.html
This shows that deregistration was approx 10weeks prior to her death on arount the 8th of March and the visit would have been the 22nd of March or therabouts
The charge says Between December and May that gives approx 3months when she was still at school
 

HomeEdMum

Well-known member
"If Graham Badman's recommendations for home tuition are adopted by the government, a whole way of life is under threat"

"Badman, who also chaired the Baby P case review, is due to publish his home education review next week, and unfortunately for home educators, their fears appear to have been justified. The review could recommend compulsory registration of home educators and set minimum standards of education."

http://tinyurl.com/p957om

This reads as if someone has seen what the recommendations are:frusty:
There is also this: http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2009/jun/05/home-schooling-education-crack-down
 
I find this quite overwhelming - I just want to do what's best for my little one. Negative resctions from family and friends are one thing, but this is quite another. I can see from the start that this is not going to be a smooth ride...
 

Diane

HEdups
Yes, I know he home educated his daughter who has subsequently gone back to school, but he is still a journalist who has obviously seen some information. I don't agree with journalists having a sneak peek at what will affect all home educators adversely. It's merely their job but it's our children's lives.

Sorry. Deeply depressed here.

Diane
http://www.threedegreesoffreedom.blogspot.com
 

Diane

HEdups
Quote from Esther's comment: 'I find this quite overwhelming - I just want to do what's best for my little one. Negative resctions from family and friends are one thing, but this is quite another. I can see from the start that this is not going to be a smooth ride...'

Hi Esther. You've started at a particularly bad time. Then again I think it's a bad time for English people altogether. Even if they do go ahead with this goon's recommendations, there will be ways around it. My first impulse is to head to Scotland where, generally, good sense prevails. They aren't having a review and don't see the need for it.

We can still help our children to learn to think. We can still do the best for our children, and help them to learn anything they need to cope with the world. You are doing the best for your child, that's what it boils down to in the end.

Diane
http://www.threedegreesoffreedom.blogspot.com
 

Elaine Kirk

Super Moderator
Yes the man who went into Oxford education and dismantled their 3 tier education system to impose his super duper streamlined idea and the ran to Kent when it turned turtle leaving heads and teachers to pick up the pieces , the man who arrived in Kent and decided his super duper idea of an IT based educational model which would be a forerunner of a new way of educating the masses , who spent so much that money was in short supply for the day to day running of the education system (heating ducts falling from ceilings just an example), the man who jumped ship yet again was handed Home Education to play with.
The question is are you going to allow a man with his track record have any say in your family life ??
 
Yes, I know he home educated his daughter who has subsequently gone back to school, but he is still a journalist who has obviously seen some information. I don't agree with journalists having a sneak peek at what will affect all home educators adversely. It's merely their job but it's our children's lives.

I totally agree with you Diane!

Sorry. Deeply depressed here.

Me too. :hug:
 

Diane

HEdups
Quote: Yes the man who went into Oxford education and dismantled their 3 tier education system to impose his super duper streamlined idea and the ran to Kent when it turned turtle leaving heads and teachers to pick up the pieces , the man who arrived in Kent and decided his super duper idea of an IT based educational model which would be a forerunner of a new way of educating the masses , who spent so much that money was in short supply for the day to day running of the education system (heating ducts falling from ceilings just an example), the man who jumped ship yet again was handed Home Education to play with.
The question is are you going to allow a man with his track record have any say in your family life ??

In a word, Elaine, my dear, NO!

I do think we can get creative here. I do think we can turn this whole thing on its head. I do think that we, each family, can go to each of our LAs and demand our rights and, more importantly, our children's rights. We can demand our backdated money, we can demand our teacher's salary, we can demand our tuition costs, the costs of private exam centres, books we buy, pencils we pay for, paper, broadband costs, cost of 'safety' items, educational visits costs... everything we can think of that schooled kids get. I plan to be in their offices every day showing them what my children are doing, they will have to read every damn internet site that my children land on, every note they write, look at every drawing they make, I will record every conversation we have, I will demand that people like writers come to visit us, I want extra tuition for lots of subjects...

I can be there every morning at nine o'clock when they stroll into work. I will demand, and demand and demand, and demand and demand. I am a terminator of demand, and I will never stop... never stop... never stop...

They will wish they had retired before the gates of hell opened. They will wish they never chose a life in the LA...

Diane
http://www.threedegreesoffreedom.blogspot.com
(Then I'll send copies of the receipts to Badman, and copies of my daughters' work and copies of what we want and copies...
 
Thank you so much for your encouraging words Diane! (post #10 in this thread!)

Oddly, we were planning to move to Scotland before heading down here - Aberdeen or Forres, they have gorgeous Steiner schools up there! Anyway, things didn't work out that way, and so here we are.. life has funny ways of working things out sometimes. Milly is thriving here, she has the kind of life that I want for her right now. So I shall focus on that for now!
 
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Elaine Kirk

Super Moderator
http://www.fassit.co.uk/petition_answered_with_spin.htm

W
e are clear that government does not bring up children - parents do - and that therefore we need to back parents and families. Our key guidance to services, "Working Together to Safeguard Children", is clear that only in exceptional cases should there be compulsory intervention in family life - for example, where this is necessary to safeguard a child from significant harm. And that such intervention should - provided this is consistent with the safety and welfare of the child - support families in making their own plans for the welfare and protection of their children. 20:20
 

Elaine Kirk

Super Moderator
Proof positive that they make it up as they go along , bugger legislation Mr Badman has his own rule book

Graham Badman: When you have a strong partnership between schools, authorities should not be afraid to use their powers of direction. We can direct admissions where there are special educational needs or looked-after children, and I do. That applies to Academies as well.
Q179 Paul Holmes: Surely you cannot direct admissions to Academies. You can ask them to take the children; you cannot direct them.

Graham Badman: Under the new code, they would find it very hard to refuse the admission of a looked-after child, for example.
Q180 Paul Holmes: None the less, even under the new code, you cannot direct Academies. You can ask but not direct, whereas you can direct mainstream schools.

Graham Badman: Well, please do not tell them in that case.
:faint:

http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200809/cmselect/cmchilsch/432/8022508.htm
 
[ before heading down here - Aberdeen or Forres, they have gorgeous Steiner schools up there! Anyway, things didn't work out that way, and so here we are.. life has funny ways of working things out sometimes. Milly is thriving here, she has the kind of life that I want for her right now. So I shall focus on that for now![/QUOTE]

I investigated Steiner for mine and while there was much I liked about it, esp the early years where the emphasis is on oral learning so kids develop great listening skills and a love of words before they can read. This was something we had already naturally followed before we even heard about Waldorf education. Apart from that I found Steiner/Waldorf to be a very rigid system of education.

Children learn specific subjects at a set age as Steiner decided that they were ready to learn them at that age so is still far from autonomous. Generally computers are not allowed until secondary level. After kindergarten the children have the one teacher which can create difficulties.

I have a number of friends whose kids have been to Steiner and have found it is not at all what they expected. One of those I know who went to Forres found that his dyslexia was not recognised, even after a formal independent assessment so he had to struggle without any support.

Four different kids endured what amounted to psychological bullying from different teachers. One was constantly told he would be expelled unless he gave up playing basketball for his city's team and was forbidden from going to trial for his national team! When he went against that ruling, he was expelled - three weeks before sitting his GCSEs.
One of the others was so damaged he is still undergoing therapy.

I do know of one who did really enjoy her experience of Steiner school - interestingly though she has chosen to home educate her own kids!

We couldn't afford it anyway and the travel time was far too much for young children. When we said this we were told we were being selfish and should move into the city where we would have been barely able to afford a one bed flat! We felt our house on the edge of a village was better suited to giving our kids quality of life.

My eldest will be 23 next week and the youngest will be 17. My eldest son did P! and P2 at primary before we withdrew him, the other two have never been to school. I can honestly say we never regretted deciding to home educate. While there were good days and bad days, there was definitely more laughter than tears. They are a constant source of inspiration to me and I have probably learned more from my children than they have learned from me!

I have been "redundant" now for 2 years as my youngest was accepted into college to study Graphic Design at just 15. I have no idea where the 15 or so years we home educated have gone - they passed so quickly and before we knew it the boys have grown into young men.

So enjoy every minute with Milly! :eek:
 
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