History home education resources

Elaine Kirk

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This website, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, makes available a database of thousands of prints and book illustrations from early modern Britain in fully-searchable form. It also offers ancillary facilities aimed to enhance users’ understanding and appreciation of the material it presents, such as various resources contextualising prints and printmaking, as well as original research on British prints to 1700, including the ‘Print of the Month’ that appears on this page.
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A search for Aesop gave me 42 results , I chose to click on the thumbnail
Dudley: Aesop serving a dish of tongues. 1678-9​
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Images on the site are zoomable.
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Title
The maryed men afronted at the jest...
Description
Aesop, ordered to serve a dinner of the best, serves up tongues at every course; Aesop presents a dish of tongues to Xanthus, seated under a canopy, and his guests; plate 10, one of thirty-two illustrations to the 2nd edition of Barlow's Aesop (1687), showing scenes from the life of Aesop. After Francis Barlow. 1678-79
Etching
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Wonderful resource :)
 
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Elaine Kirk

Super Moderator

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from the BBC
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On 21 June, 1940, more than 1,300 bewildered children arrived in Glasgow - a city most of them had never even heard of.

Only two days before, these youngsters had been enjoying a carefree afternoon, swimming or playing after school on the beautiful and peaceful island of Guernsey.

The Channel Islands had been largely unaffected by the start of the war.
But that summer, the sound and flashes of gunfire could be seen and heard across the sea in nearby France. The German army was advancing.

The British government decided the Channel Islands could no longer be defended.

On Guernsey, all children aged five to 14 were evacuated, unless their parents chose to keep them with them.

It was the stuff of nightmares.

To send your children away to an unknown place, in the hope they'd be taken in by strangers - not knowing when, or even if, you'd see them again.


Most of the children had never been on a ship before they set sail in 1940
In the middle of the night, at schools around the island, parents hugged their youngsters and waved them off.
Clutching pillowslips or bags containing a couple of vests, pants and socks, perhaps a favourite toy, something to eat on the journey, the children were bundled on to buses.

They were driven to an assortment of waiting ships in the harbour, many coming straight from the Dunkirk landings.

Arriving on the south coast of England hours later, they were checked over, fed and watered and bundled onto trains heading north.

Most of these young people had never been on a ship before. They'd never left the island.

They'd never seen a train, a busy road - or a black and white cow.

The youngest were terrified, grief-stricken and missing their families. They'd left behind everything and everyone they'd ever known.

Some of the older kids regarded it as all as a bit of an adventure. For the teachers and helpers accompanying them, it was an onerous responsibility.
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Egyptology

Hi. I hope there are no objections to my posting all the links I've collected. :)

Best wishes
Jane
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url: http://www.akhet.co.uk/index.htm
title: Akhet
description: \\\'Akhet Egyptology\\\', one of the UK\\\'s oldest Ancient Egypt websites and an ideal place to start exploring the wonders of the past. Find out about the people of this amazing culture, and learn about the gods they worshiped, the leaders they followed and the monuments and statues they left behind. One of the best websites on Ancient Egypt

url: http://www.nms.ac.uk/education__activities/kids_only/egyptian_tomb_adventure.aspx
title: National Museum Scotland
description: Egyptian Tomb Adventure

url: http://www.nms.ac.uk/education/games_and_fun/discover_the_egyptians.aspx
title: National Museum of Scotland
description: List of games relating to Egypt

url: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/pyramid/explore/
title: PBS Explore a Pyramid

url: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/pyramid/explore/sphinx.html
title: PBS Restoring the Sphinx

url: http://www.harcourtschool.com/activity/cartouche/cartouche.html
title: Cartouche Activity

url: http://www.egypt-tehuti.org/articles/egyptian-calendar.html
title: Egyptian Calendar
description:

url: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/egypt/explore/boat.html
title: Pharaoh's Boat (Solar Barque)

url: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/pharaohs/mummy.html
title: How Mummy's Are Made

url: http://marg.mhost.com/mugifs/Egypt/egypt.htm
title: Quiz

url: http://www.quia.com/rr/7921.html
title: Vocabulary

url: http://www.memphis.edu/egypt/egypt.php
title: Institute of Egyptian Art and Archaeology
 
Thank you very much Jane! My girls love absolutely anything to do with ancient Egypt, will show them your sites tomorrow.......

Thanks for sharing.
Gemma.x
 

Elaine Kirk

Super Moderator

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It is often assumed that the main task of an architectural paint researcher is to identify the original colours employed in an historic building. Whilst this can be established if sufficient evidence survives much much more information can often be obtained.
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While sampling in the 1705 house a workman brought me a lump of paint that he had prised off the external timber cornice. At first I thought that it was a piece of china, such was the weight and shape. However, it was immediately clear from the traces of the characteristic early eighteenth century red oxide primer at the bottom to the bright white final layers at the top that I was holding three hundred years of the buildings decorative history.
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The 71 schemes applied to the building


The house was built in 1705, the year that Queen Anne knighted Isaac Newton, the first scientist ever to receive the honour.

Taking a number of subsequent random dates we can see how the building was painted in:

1726, when Voltaire arrives in England, and Benjamin Franklin leaves for Philadelphia;

1752 - Britain adopts the Gregorian calendar, and we lose the days between the 3rd and 13th of September that year

1770 - Captain James Cook drops anchor in what he would name Botany Bay, and the crew of the Endeavour become the first recorded Europeans in Australia.

1800 - The Acts of Union is signed by George III, creating the United Kingdom the following year.

1830 - The Liverpool and Manchester Railway opens the first intercity rail service between the two cities, under steam power.

1865 - Isabella Beeton dies and W.B. Yeats is born

1900 - Winston Churchill is elected to Parliament for the first time

1939 - The Second World War begins

1975 - Margaret Thatcher becomes leader of the Conservative Party and Bill Gates founds the Microsoft Corporation

It appears that the building was last painted in 2005, the year in which the Provisional IRA issued a statement formally ordering an end to the armed campaign that it had been pursuing since 1969.

In my years as a paint researcher I have never encountered such a complete sequence of decorative schemes. Literally, history in the palm of ones hand.
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These are only snippets - for much more information go to
 

Elaine Kirk

Super Moderator

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London Historians was launched in August 2010 as a club for Londoners who’d like to learn more about their city’s history. We’ll be organising visits, talks, walks, social events and discounts to selected historical attractions and exhibitions.

We’ll also feature tons of useful information on the web site to give you a single launch pad to everything you want to find out about London’s history. We’ll encourage members to contribute information and reviews to the site.

If you’d like to become a Founder Member of London Historians, please go to the Join Us page.
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Latest pdf upload is Westminster Bridge and the beauty of pdf's is that they can be printed out
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In the 11th century, Westminster became the centre of government, at first of England and then of the whole of the United Kingdom. It seems incredible that no bridge was built here until 1750. Until then Old London Bridge was the only permanent river crossing in the central London area.
The first serious attempt to obtain authority for the construction of a bridge at Westminster was made in 1664 when Charles II presided over a meeting of the Privy Council to discuss the matter. Strong reasons were put forward in favour of a new bridge. The arguments against the bridge were put forward by the City Corporation, the watermen and other vested interests. They claimed that if a new bridge were built at Westminster, many watermen would lose their jobs, thus depriving the navy of a ready supply of sailors in time of war. Finally the opponents of the bridge came up with one argument that clinched the matter, in the form of an unsecured and interest free loan of £100,000 to the King from the City Corporation. The King gratefully accepted the bribe, and refused permission to build the bridge.
As London expanded...........
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Join London Historians on facebook
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Follow London Historians on Twitter
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Historical Maps

Historic maps for students & teachers

Welcome to ETC's collection of historic maps. Here you will find over 5,000 maps representing many different time periods. A friendly license allows teachers and students to use up to 25 maps in non-commercial school projects without further permission. All maps are available as GIF or JPEG files for screen display as well as in PDF for printing. Use the GIF or JPEG maps for classroom presentations and student websites. Use the PDF maps for displays, bulletin boards, and printed school reports.

Licence
Educational Use. A maximum of twenty-five (25) maps may be used in any non-commercial, educational project (report, presentation, display, website, etc.) without special permission. The use of more than twenty-five maps in a single project requires written permission from the Florida Center for Instructional Technology (FCIT) at USF.
 

Elaine Kirk

Super Moderator
Romans invented 'Swiss army knife' 2,000 years ago

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Romans invented 'Swiss army knife' 2,000 years ago
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from the .

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A 2000-year-old tool that has gone on display in a Cambridge museum has been taken as proof that the Romans invented the Swiss army knife.
The Roman version of the famous multi-purpose tool includes a spoon, knife, three pronged fork, spike and even what looks like a toothpick.
At only 15cm long it would have fitted easily into the pocket of a discerning diner and is easy to clean and sharpen thanks to the silver and iron used to make it.
The Roman eating implement has been estimated to date from between 201 to 300 AD and originates from the Mediterranean region of Europe.
The tool is currently on display for the first time at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.
Lucy Theobald, a spokesperson for the museum, said: "It's believed to be an example of a Roman 'Swiss army knife' - a silver implement with a knife, spoon, fork, a spike for extracting meat from snails, and a spatula, which is believed to have been used for poking sauce out of narrow-necked bottles."
Experts believed the device, which was found in the Mediterranean, would have been used by a well-off traveller.
 

Elaine Kirk

Super Moderator
First Americans 'reached Europe five centuries before Columbus voyages'


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First Americans 'reached Europe five centuries before Columbus voyages'First Americans 'reached Europe five centuries before Columbus voyages'
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from the .
The first Americans reached Europe five centuries before Christopher Columbus "discovered" the New World, according to claims made by a Spanish university team.
Scientists tracing the genetic origins of an Icelandic family believe the first American arrived in Europe around the 10th century, a full five hundred years before Columbus set off on his first voyage of discovery in 1492.
Norse sagas suggest the Vikings discovered the Americas centuries before Columbus and the latest data seems to support the hypothesis that they may have brought American Indians back with them to northern Europe.
Research indicates that a woman from the North American continent probably arrived in Iceland some time around 1000AD leaving behind genes that are reflected in about 80 Icelanders today.
 

Elaine Kirk

Super Moderator
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American History
On The Water
American whaling​
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Whale Chart, 1851
By 1851, overfishing had decimated whale populations in the Atlantic Ocean. Most whalers moved to the Pacific and Indian oceans. Ships traveled north and south with the seasons, following the large whale populations on their annual migrations.

This chart was produced by oceanographer Lt. Matthew Fontaine Maury for the U.S. Navy. It showed whale populations in the world’s major seas and oceans and aided hundreds of whalers in finding their prey.

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Ivory Jagging Wheel, 1800s

Pie crimpers, or jagging wheels, were common scrimshaw items made by American whalemen. The fluted wheel was used to cut dough or seal the top of a piecrust
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http://americanhistory.si.edu/onthewater/assets/object/255/2009-5596.jpg
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A Whaler’s Tale, 1800s

In early 1841, at age 21, Herman Melville shipped out on a voyage to the Pacific Ocean aboard the whaler Acushnet. He deserted in the Marquesas Islands after only 18 months and then served briefly on other ships. His time at sea supplied the background for his novel Moby-Dick, or The Whale, published in 1851.

The first American edition of Moby-Dick sold poorly and netted Melville only $556.37. In the 1920s, however, the book’s reputation began to rise. Illustrated by American artist Rockwell Kent, this 1930 edition of Moby-Dick introduced whaling to thousands of Americans.
 
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Elaine Kirk

Super Moderator

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The Charles Dickens Museum has secured funding of £2m from the Heritage Lottery Fund for Great Expectations, a major redevelopment project to radically change and increase display areas and improve the overall visitor experience at the Museum in Doughty Street, London, for the bicentenary of Dickens’s birth in 2012.
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There is a .
Screenshot of fun page on 2012 site
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Elaine Kirk

Super Moderator
Birmingham in the Blitz

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From the .
Birmingham in the Blitz stories

Undaunted, Brum stands up to raids
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School project spans the generation gap
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'Make do and mend' clothing
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Raids that rocked Birmingham
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'Pigs in blankets' hidden from cop
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Read more stories
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Birmingham in the Blitz memories
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Carl Chinn column: Remembering the Birmingham Small Arms Company Nov 20 2010
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Your Blitz: For me, it didn't all end in tragedy
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Your Blitz: We knew we'd been hit and sat in silence
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Your Blitz: Rescued by my own unknown hero
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Mum and dad got married.. next day they were building Spitfires
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Birmingham in the Blitz: Wylde Green resident recalls role of his family in the war
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More memories of the blitz

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THE term ‘pigs in blankets’ has never been more apt than during the Blitz.

So precious a commodity was pork, as all meats were, that those living through the war effort were forced to tell the odd porky.

It was not uncommon, amid the constraints of food rationing, for neighbours to grow their own produce or keep their own livestock.

All piglets produced had to be registered by the Ministry of Food which would send an inspector out whenever offspring were due.


The Ministry would expect a maximum batch of 11 piglets for each birth to then be distributed among people in the area.

So when owners were fortunate enough to have reared a prolific pig, delivering more than 11, the extras were not declared and hidden from inspectors.

Quite how did people manage to conceal a young pig?

John Marvin, 71, from Aldridge, was reliably informed of the answer in later life by his mother.

He explained: “The men used to ask the women to put the pigs into a pram and walk them around for a few hours until the inspectors had gone.”

But it wasn’t quite that simple.

For newborn pigs squeal every bit as much as the grown-ups.

“To stop them squealing They used to dose them up with cough medicine. It used to knock the piglets out,” said John.

This meaty scam did not go entirely unnoticed as the local bobby would usually be tipped off by a member of the community.

“The local policeman and pub landlord, who were powerful members of the community in those days, would know all about the extras,’ said John

“Quite often the policeman would leave with a leg and the landlord some fillets.

“The rest was shared out – you couldn’t really disguise cooking pork because of the smell
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Link .
 

Elaine Kirk

Super Moderator

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Between Magna Carta and the Parliamentary State: The fine rolls of King Henry III 1216–1272 and the project​
A fine in the reign of King Henry III (1216–1272) was an agreement to pay the king a sum of money for a specified concession. The rolls on which the fines were recorded provide the earliest systematic evidence of what people and institutions across society wanted from the king and he was prepared to give. They open a large window onto the politics, government, economy and society of England in the hinge period between the establishment of Magna Carta at the start of Henry’s reign and the parliamentary state which was emerging at its end. This Project, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, makes the rolls freely available to a wide audience while at the same time, in the Fine of the Month feature, providing regular comment on their historical interest.
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All the rolls have translation pages
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Link can from @KedlestonDerby
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His Medieval history website - Kedleston.org.uk
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Elaine Kirk

Super Moderator
CIA decodes Civil War message in a bottle after 147 years

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A message in a bottle sent to a Confederate general during the Siege of Vicksburg, one of the key turning points of the American Civil War, has finally been deciphered after 147 years.
The glass vial stopped with a cork contained a coded missive to Lt Gen John C Pemberton, who was besieged in the Mississippi city by Union forces led by Ulysses S Grant.
After nearly six weeks people in Vicksburg had resorted to eating cats, dogs and leather, and making soup from wallpaper paste.
The encrypted, six line message was dated July 4, 1863, the date of Pemberton's surrender, and would have offered no hope to him. It said: "You can expect no help from this side of the river."
The source of the message is thought to have been Maj Gen John G. Walker, of the Texas Division.
Pemberton had also held out hope that General Joseph E Johnston, and his 32,000 Confederate troops camped south of Vicksburg, would eventually come to his aid, but Walker's message made clear that was not going to happen.
Catherine Wright, collections manager at the Museum of the Confederacy, said: "He's saying 'I can't help you. I have no troops, I have no supplies, I have no way to get over there.'
"It was just another punctuation mark to just how desperate and dire everything was."
The bottle also contained a bullet, which was thought to have been to weigh it down if the messenger was caught and had to throw it in a river.
It had been kept in the museum since 1896 before being opened. The message initially appeared to be a random collection of letters but was deciphered after several weeks by David Gaddy, a retired CIA code breaker.
It had been drawn up using the Vigenere cipher, which involves shifting letters of the alphabet a set number of places.
Vicksburg was so scarred by the siege that it refused to celebrate July 4 for the next 80 years.
 

Elaine Kirk

Super Moderator
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from .
During WW II Lockheed (unbelievable 1940s pictures). This is a version of special effects during the 1940's. I have never seen these pictures or knew that we had gone this far to protect ourselves. During World War II the Army Corps of Engineers needed to hide the Lockheed Burbank Aircraft Plant to protect it from a possible Japanese air attack. They covered it with camouflage netting to make it look like a rural subdivision from the air.....more....
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There are many photo's of which these Before and After shots are awesome .
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Before
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After
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Elaine Kirk

Super Moderator
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The history of Katla Volcano in Iceland
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Once it happened that the Abbot of the Monastery of Thykkvabœ had a housekeeper whose name was Katla, and who was an evil-minded and hot-tempered woman. She possessed a pair of shoes whose peculiarity was, that whoever put them on was never tired of running. Everybody was afraid of Katla’s bad disposition and fierce temper, even the Abbot himself. The herdsman of the monastery farm, whose name was Bardi, was often dreadfully ill-treated by her, particularly if he had chanced to lose any of the ewes.

One day in the autumn the Abbot and his housekeeper went to a wedding, leaving orders with Bardi to drive in the sheep and milk them before they came home. But unhappily, when the time came, the herdsman could not find all the ewes; so he went into the house, put on Katla’s magic shoes, and sallied out in search of the stray sheep. He had a long way to run before he discovered them, but felt no fatigue, so drove all the flock in quite briskly.

When Katla returned, she immediately perceived that the herdsman had been using her shoes, so she took him and drowned him in a large tubful of curds. Nobody knew what had become of the man, and as the winter went on, and the curds in the tub sank lower and lower, Katla was heard to say these words to herself: ‘Soon will the waves of milk break upon the foot-soles of Bardi!’

Shortly after this, dreading that the murder should be found out, and that she should be condemned to death, she took her magic shoes, and ran from the monastery to a great ice-mountain, into a rift of which she leaped, and was never seen again.

As soon as she had disappeared, a fearful eruption took place from the mountain, and the lava rolled down and destroyed the monastery at which she had lived. People declared that her witchcraft had been the cause of this, and called the crater of the mountain, ‘The Rift of Katla’.

Jón Arnason, ‘The Legend of Katla’, from Icelandic Legends (London: Richard Bentley, 1864), pp. 134-5.
 
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