Can you help? International research by Dr Brian Rae on barriers to home ed

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Administrator
Dr Brian Rae is undertaking an international research project, the findings of which will be presented at the Global Home Education Conference in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil in March 2016.

He has asked us to circulate his request to home educators and potential home educators in the UK who would be willing to participate in his study to help identify, understand and compare the barriers facing parents, internationally, who choose to home educate their children, and to propose solutions for removing such barriers.

As he points out, much research explores the reasons for homeschooling but little examines the obstacles or hindrances to parents beginning home education.

Dear Parent (or someday parent),

We invite and encourage you to participate in some very important research related to homeschooling (or home education).

The purpose of this international research initiative is to identify, understand, and compare barriers that parents face in choosing to home educate their children.

Results of this study will be used to help equip parents to make more informed decisions in the education of their children, and to propose solutions for removing barriers to homeschooling (or home education).

Get started now and take the survey


Dr. Brian D. Ray is internationally known for his research on homeschooling. He is trusted by the global homeschool (home education) community and he is the investigator for this project.

All data will be confidentially analyzed. All results will be presented in an anonymous way. You will receive a free summary of the research results if you want one.

We urge you to help us with this internationally important project by completing the survey.
NOTE: Scotland has been listed as a separate nation from United Kingdom for some reason!
 
NOTE: Scotland has been listed as a separate nation from United Kingdom for some reason!
I assume that's because the laws in Scotland are different to England and Wales, although NI could be separated on that basis too because while they have the same basic wording, there's a big bunfight in progress over interpretation. Also allow for the fact that some parts of the world treat the whole island as "England" and have no clues as to the distinction between "England", "Great Britain", "United Kingdom" and "British Isles".
 
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